Let’s Get Together – Elementary End-of-Year Check-In

Last Saturday, Ruth Hanna and I facilitated the last of our Saturday Mid-Year Check-In courses. Over the course of 4 Saturdays, around 50 elementary school teachers gave their time to sit down and reflect on their practice and plan together for the second half of the school year. Across each course, we had rich conversations about what it means to help support a culture of reading and writing at the elementary level and how to better help all students chart pathways to reading and creating complex texts.

While we were pleased with the turnout each Saturday, we also appreciate the sacrifice of giving a Saturday to plan for our classrooms.

If I’ve been to your classroom or school over the last few months, you may recall me saying this is the “what” year of implementing our new elementary literacy resources and next year is the “how” year. Well, we wanted to make sure there’s space for thinking about the “how”.

We invite you to join us Tuesday, May 30 from 8 – 4 at Timberline pK-8 for and end-of-year check-in. Folks from across the district will be sitting down together to reflect on the close of our year and plan for how to improve our practice and learning next year.

If you can manage it, I encourage grade-level teams to come together and take a day to say, “What do we want to remember for next year?”

The course is open for registration right now through OPD – bit.ly/svvsdcheckin.

See you there!

Notes from the Classroom: Starting with ReadyGen

Reading

When navigating change, it can be incredibly helpful to look to those who have gone before us to find the way through. This first post of Notes from the Classroom comes from 3rd-grade pilot teacher Susan Tatum who shares what she’s doing in her classroom and how she’s using ReadyGen to support reading and writing for her students.

Thoughts on the New Year
Right now, at the beginning of the school year, you don’t need to worry about the small group element of your reading block. ReadyGen is whole-group-centered, so spending your time getting comfortable with that aspect of the program is essential in the beginning of the school year.  The teacher’s manuals have great routines in the resource tab at the back of the book.

Spend time getting your students comfortable with the close reading strategies and how to talk and write about their reading using academic language.  Make sure ALL students in your class have access to the anchor texts. Get familiar with the scaffolding strategies in your Scaffolded Strategies Handbook so you can help all students feel successful with the text.

In My Room
I’m spending time with my kids teaching them how to be deeper thinkers about their reading.
Rather than just the typical Think Pair Share, they are using sentence starters such as, “I agree with what you said about ___________.” and “I understand your point about __________, but I think _________.”  This is a routine found at the back of the Teacher’s Manual.

I want my kids to talk about their reading in more meaningful ways. I’m spending the majority of my Whole Group time working on these strategies. Eventually, we’ll take these strategies into a small group format where the students will be guiding their own discussions based on questions I have given them. Taking the time to firmly get these practices into place will pay off a great deal in the whole group and small group settings.


Have a Note from the Classroom you’d like to share on the Language Arts Blog? Send it to Chase_Zachary@svvsd.org.