Oct. ’17 Elementary Literacy Show – Whole Group

Keri Campbell, Brittany McKinsey, Amanda Ladoux

Reflection Questions:

  • What did you learn?
  • How did the content of the episode shift or support your understanding of whole group?
  • If we think of engagement as students doing the bulk of the work, talking, & learning; what might this mean how might this shift your thinking around whole group time?
  • How can whole group instruction and small group instruction feed into one another?
  • What curricular resources do you want to investigate further to help your instructional practice?

Resources:

  • Goal setting for lessons-what do you want your kids to learn and be able to do at the end of the lesson.
  • Teachers are using Thinking Maps-bridge map used for making connections, cause and effect map-teachers using as well as GT teachers – Thinking Maps and Text Structure
  • Mixed ability groups-primarily during whole group cooperative learning time.
  • Routines – going back into the text and finding information – Scaffolded Strategies Handbook, write-turn-talk, turn-talk-write, “What did you hear your partner say?”
  • Socratic Seminar approach during whole group.
  • Nearpod-Interactive lessons/whole group/formative assessment/student engagement (District Nearpod Library access)
  • Best practices for engagement – Marzano’s Best Practice Instructional Strategies

Technology Integration Resources:

  • Padlet – (student engagement tool for responses, sharing ideas, etc)
  • Clips – (can be used to video, voice record, take photos, create/choose filters, text bubbles-similar to iMovie.  Clips is very user friendly for students. Is a great resource for adding creativity in learning vocabulary.

Ready Gen:

Ready Gen routines-think/pair/share, read aloud routine

  • Scaffolded Strategies Handbook
  • Leveled Readers

Flexible Seating Approach during whole group:

Notes from the Classroom: Starting with ReadyGen

Reading

When navigating change, it can be incredibly helpful to look to those who have gone before us to find the way through. This first post of Notes from the Classroom comes from 3rd-grade pilot teacher Susan Tatum who shares what she’s doing in her classroom and how she’s using ReadyGen to support reading and writing for her students.

Thoughts on the New Year
Right now, at the beginning of the school year, you don’t need to worry about the small group element of your reading block. ReadyGen is whole-group-centered, so spending your time getting comfortable with that aspect of the program is essential in the beginning of the school year.  The teacher’s manuals have great routines in the resource tab at the back of the book.

Spend time getting your students comfortable with the close reading strategies and how to talk and write about their reading using academic language.  Make sure ALL students in your class have access to the anchor texts. Get familiar with the scaffolding strategies in your Scaffolded Strategies Handbook so you can help all students feel successful with the text.

In My Room
I’m spending time with my kids teaching them how to be deeper thinkers about their reading.
Rather than just the typical Think Pair Share, they are using sentence starters such as, “I agree with what you said about ___________.” and “I understand your point about __________, but I think _________.”  This is a routine found at the back of the Teacher’s Manual.

I want my kids to talk about their reading in more meaningful ways. I’m spending the majority of my Whole Group time working on these strategies. Eventually, we’ll take these strategies into a small group format where the students will be guiding their own discussions based on questions I have given them. Taking the time to firmly get these practices into place will pay off a great deal in the whole group and small group settings.


Have a Note from the Classroom you’d like to share on the Language Arts Blog? Send it to Chase_Zachary@svvsd.org.