Our Words Matter

A recent article in EdWeek shared the results of a survey:

A survey last month of more than 2,500 parents found that they generally rank math and science as lower in importance and relevance to their children’s lives than reading. Moreover, 38 percent of parents, including half the fathers surveyed, agreed with the statement “Skills in math are mostly useful for those that have careers related to math, so average Americans do not have much need for math skills,” according to the survey by the Overdeck and Simons foundations.

Another key quote from the article:

“Nobody is proud to say, ‘I can barely read,’ but plenty of parents are proud to stand up and say, ‘I can barely do math, I didn’t grow up doing well in math, and my kid’s not doing well in math; that’s just the way it is,’ ” said Mike Steele, a math education professor at the University of Wisconsin-Milwaukee who was not associated with the study…”We need to shift the mindset that math is just some innate ability that has a genetic component, and you are either a math person or you are not, to a conception that everybody can do math with effort and support … and to understand why that’s important.”

Our words matter. Changing our own beliefs and the language we use with children around mathematics is important if we want students to succeed in this area. Jo Boaler has created and published several resources around the notion of “Growth Mindset” in mathematics to support this change. Instead of saying, “I’m not good at math,” what if we begin to say, “I’m not good at math…yet!”  It gives us as adults room to grow and learn new things, too. And perhaps that’s the best model we can be for our children and young learners.